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Podcast Episode 3

Podcast Episode 3

Food and Biodiversity with Dr Lenore Newman

Food and Biodiversity with Dr Lenore Newman

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Lenore talk about the food we eat and how this impacts biodiversity. They discuss everything from the American Bison and the extinction of the passenger pigeon to our food supply chains, COVID-19, and the historic lunch that founded Canada. They also discuss the most sustainable diet, the merits of eating organic versus local, and how you can’t catch a virus from a plant. Lenore also sets the record straight about a very famous quote we are all familiar with, so make sure you listen to the end.

Lenore Newman

About Lenore Newman

Lenore Newman holds a Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of the Fraser Valley, where she is currently an Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment. She also serves as Director of the Food and Agriculture Institute at UFV. Lenore’s academic career as a culinary geographer has included fieldwork around the globe in the study of public markets, regional cuisines, farmland preservation, global food security, and the ecology of the world’s food system.

Lenore’s first book, Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey, was published by University of Regina Press in 2017 and won a Saskatchewan book prize. It has been reviewed in the National Post, the Toronto Star, and The Globe and Mail, and led to fifty print, radio, and

television interviews, including on The Current, North by Northwest, CKNW, and Unreserved. She recently published The Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food that was reviewed by NPRthe National PostCBC, and the Atlantic. Lenore has also authored over forty academic papers and reports in her areas of research. She is particularly proud of her work on foraged foods and on the impact of climate change on cuisine.

Lenore’s work has received widespread attention, and in 2014 she was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She has published op-eds in Georgia Straight, the Vancouver Sun, The Globe and Mail, Alternatives Magazine, and Modern Agriculture Magazine, and she has been interviewed for a diverse and growing range of media outlets on topics such as farmland protection, Canadian cuisine, and the future of food.

About Lenore Newman

Lenore Newman

Lenore Newman holds a Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of the Fraser Valley, where she is currently an Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment. She also serves as Director of the Food and Agriculture Institute at UFV. Lenore’s academic career as a culinary geographer has included fieldwork around the globe in the study of public markets, regional cuisines, farmland preservation, global food security, and the ecology of the world’s food system.

Lenore’s first book, Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey, was published by University of Regina Press in 2017 and won a Saskatchewan book prize. It has been reviewed in the National Post, the Toronto Star, and The Globe and Mail, and led to fifty print, radio, and television interviews, including on The Current, North by Northwest, CKNW, and Unreserved. She recently published The Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food that was reviewed by NPRthe National PostCBC, and the Atlantic. Lenore has also authored over forty academic papers and reports in her areas of research. She is particularly proud of her work on foraged foods and on the impact of climate change on cuisine.

Lenore’s work has received widespread attention, and in 2014 she was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She has published op-eds in Georgia Straight, the Vancouver Sun, The Globe and Mail, Alternatives Magazine, and Modern Agriculture Magazine, and she has been interviewed for a diverse and growing range of media outlets on topics such as farmland protection, Canadian cuisine, and the future of food.

Episode Notes

DR LENORE NEWMAN’S RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS

FOOD AS KEYSTONE AND PASSENGER PIGEONS

OCEAN RECOVERY WITHIN 30 YEARS

TACKLING BIODIVERSITY LOSS AND CLIMATE CHANGE TOGETHER

WHAT IS REWILDING?

40% OF EARTH’S LAND SURFACE IS DEDICATED TO AGRICULTURE

SVALBARD GLOBAL SEED VAULT

WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME

QUOTE: “TELL ME WHAT YOU EAT AND I WILL TELL YOU WHO YOU ARE”

THE LUNCH THAT FOUNDED CANADA

CHARLOTTE RUSSE DESSERT

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