Together, we can make a difference

Whether you live in a city, the suburbs or the country, your community is full of biodiversity. A first step in tackling biodiversity loss in your community is becoming familiar with local biodiversity. Connecting and collaborating with local and community organizations that are already protecting nature is another great step. With more and more people helping small creatures to thrive, diversity in your community will start to spread.

While this list is by no means exhaustive, it’s a great start. And not every solution will work for your community. With more and more communities hosting initiatives to support biodiversity, these actions may spread across cities and regions before reaching local, provincial/territorial and the federal government.

What are some community-based solutions for protecting biodiversity?

Plastic waste on beach with people picking up trash

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Adults and children looking at wildlife in forest during Bioblitz

COMMUNITY LEADERS

LOCAL COLLABORATION:

o   Support and collaboration with local non-profits, environmental groups and schools

o   National pollinator monitoring program

o   Habitat restoration projects in city parks, right-of-ways and along roadways to create pollinator pathways across Canada

 

INFORMATION SHARING:

o   Biodiversity conservation promotion in communities, including urban centres, for enhanced education, appreciation and protection of nature

o   Information sharing on existing environmental community policies to highlight areas for improvement

o   Biodiversity conservation resource sharing in online community groups

o   “Nature-full” and Biophilic Cities initiatives that promote conservation as an urban challenge

 

VOLUNTEER: Volunteer work with local environmental organizations

 

CLEAN-UP:

o   Beach and shoreline cleanups

o   Trash collection and disposal in parks and ecosystems

INDIGENOUS VOICES: Inclusion and elevation of Indigenous communities and projects in events, exhibits and initiatives (i.e. Clam Garden Network)

 

EXHIBITS, EVENTS & INITATIVES:

o   Community exhibits, displays and events (beyond museum walls) that promote biodiversity education (i.e. National Geographic Ark project, Serengeti of the Arctic, Students on Ice, Earth Rangers and Canadian Wildlife Federation Species at Risk project, etc.)

o   Public art and community engagement events highlighting biodiversity conservation (i.e. farmer’s markets, festivals, etc.)

o   Citizen scientist events such as a BioBlitz (a model developed by the Royal Ontario Museum, Nature Canada and BioBlitz Canada 150)

o   Community tree planting events (i.e. 50 million tree program in Ontario)

 

 

* Image by Mount Rainier National Park from Ashford, WA, United States via Wikimedia Commons. Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic. No changes were made.

Plastic waste on beach with people picking up trash

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

LOCAL COLLABORATION: Support and collaboration with local non-profits, environmental groups and schools

 

INFORMATION SHARING:

o   Biodiversity conservation promotion in communities, including urban centres, for enhanced education, appreciation and protection of nature

o   Information sharing on existing environmental community policies to highlight areas for improvement

o   Biodiversity conservation resource sharing in online community groups

o   “Nature-full” and Biophilic Cities initiatives that promote conservation as an urban challenge

 

VOLUNTEER: Volunteer work with local environmental organizations

 

CLEAN-UP:

o   Beach and shoreline cleanups

o   Trash collection and disposal in parks and ecosystems

Adults and children looking at wildlife in forest during Bioblitz

COMMUNITY LEADERS

INDIGENOUS VOICES: Inclusion and elevation of Indigenous communities and projects in events, exhibits and initiatives (i.e. Clam Garden Network)

 

EXHIBITS, EVENTS & INITATIVES:

o   Community exhibits, displays and events (beyond museum walls) that promote biodiversity education (i.e. National Geographic Ark project, Serengeti of the Arctic, Students on Ice, Earth Rangers and Canadian Wildlife Federation Species at Risk project, etc.)

o   Public art and community engagement events highlighting biodiversity conservation (i.e. farmer’s markets, festivals, etc.)

o   Citizen scientist events such as a BioBlitz (a model developed by the Royal Ontario Museum, Nature Canada and BioBlitz Canada 150)

o   Community tree planting events (i.e. 50 million tree program in Ontario)

 

 

* Image by Mount Rainier National Park from Ashford, WA, United States via Wikimedia Commons. Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic. No changes were made.